Infectious

Most of the time the word infectious is use to convey a disease or a disease-causing organism. However, this same word could imply the ability to influence others in a rapid manner. Often we underestimate the power of a smile or the smallest act of caring. In fact most smiles are started by another smile creating a contagious affect. This act of smiling can have the potential to turn someone day around. For M a smile is like free therapy and a universal welcome. There used to be a young lady that worked in the education office with me. She had a smile that lighted the whole office reflecting to others that there was a caring person inside. Whenever M would visit the office she would smile and say “HEY!” Hence, her smile gave a positive countenance making M feel comfortable. Overtime, M started smiling and saying “HEEEEEEY” not only to her but to anyone coming into the office. Yes, she had infected M.  Few things in the world are more infectious/powerful than a smile. M felt confident in being self around her. Thus, M became sociable. Noteworthy when she left to go be with her beloved overseas, M kept looking for her in the office saying “Heeeeeey.” In time others now affected by Ms’ smile started smiling and saying “Hey” back to M. The young lady may never know all the good that her beautiful simple smile had on others, especially M. This experience with M taught me a smile can be the key that fits the lock of everybody’s heart.

Simply an autism mom learning

Remembrance

Grief is painful. However, if it’s transform into remembrance, then you’re magnifying the person lost and giving something of that person to others, so they can experience something of that person. When I think of my mom it brings back  memorable moments cooking together, laughing together, dancing together and tears of sorrow/ joy together. Sharing my unforgettable memories of my mom with M may inspire hope and create a bridge to the future. She had a special connection with M. Their close bond started on the day M was born. As M grew, my mom had a way of communicating with M that transcended words. One of the most beautiful thing about my mom was that she could see M true colors shining. I remember the countless doctor appointments with M how my mom was right there. After each visit she would get M to look into her brown eyes and state “You’re smart and you can do anything you set your mind to do, never forget that.”  M face would light-up when ever my mom was around. It was because of my mom love that M finally started eating some types of food. Although my mom died one month before M received the official diagnose of autism, she had loved M unconditionally. In honest, I worried would M remember the countless moments of love, time, understanding and compassion my mom bestowed on us. A few weeks ago while in the den, M glanced up to look at some pictures I had on the wall. M pointed and said “Nanna.” In that moment I cried. M taught me memories of my mom life, love and compassion will continue…in M.

Simply an autism mom learning

Connection(s)

Life is full of making human and mental connections. We learn from every one of these connections. The learning from those connections is what will help illuminate our world to endless wonder. In fact even a brief connection with a person, thing or idea can change the way a person think about themselves. The beauty of M ability is the way M process the world and learn to connect with it. Thus, what looks simple to others can be a milestone to M. I remember when my father used to pick M up from pre-school everyday. He would take M across a huge bridge to go home. Everyday as they passed over the bridge my father would say “M water…look M water.” Some days had pass before M finally pointed and repeated “waer” aka ‘water’ as they crossed the bridge to go home. M had made a connection not only with my father but with the water under the bridge. Noteworthy, my father called me at work happy that M said water. My father experience with M taught me that life is about making connections and learning; waiting and growing; practicing patience and being persistent. Additionally, M taught me to cherish our human connections because that can make life worth living.

Simply an autism mom learning